plyWooden Boat Festival at Port A

Port Aransas hosted it’s third annual plyWooden Boat Festival the weekend of October 8-10, 2016.  I took some time off work and brought my wife down for a combination boat show/mini-vacation.  The boat show was great!  I was told that there wasn’t as many boats as there were in the two previous years, but I was impressed with the quality of the boats.  Some of the boats were professionally built, many were built by the owner, and it was often difficult to tell which was which.  There was also a good variety of boats, with sail, power and human-powered boats all well represented.  The people, both other exhibitors and the visitors, were all friendly and easy to talk to.  Congrats to all the sponsors and volunteers who worked on this event, y’all did a fine job!

I’ll apologize in advance; there were some boats that I didn’t get pictures of.  And anybody who knows me will testify that I’m horrible with names.  Having said that, here’s some pictures of some of the boats that were at the show…

Strip-built kayak.
Strip-built kayak.
A Swifty 14 in front, and a Michalak-designed Mayfly 14 behind.
A Swifty 14 in front, and a Michalak-designed Mayfly 14 behind.
"Sirena", a sailing skiff with two one-person kayaks.
“Sirena”, a sailing skiff with two one-person kayaks.
Westport Sharpie on left and Caledonia Yawl on right. The Caledonia was designed by Iain Oughtred, who also designed Tammie Norrie.
Westport Sharpie on left and Caledonia Yawl on right. The Caledonia was designed by Iain Oughtred, who also designed Tammie Norrie.
John Welsford-designed Saturday Night Special.
John Welsford-designed Saturday Night Special.
Arch Davis-designed Sand Dollar. Arch Davis also designed my Penobscot 14, Wee Lass.
Arch Davis-designed Sand Dollar. Arch Davis also designed my Penobscot 14, Wee Lass.
Sand Dollar with her canvas up. The standing lug sail is very similar to that used for Wee Lass; the rudder design is also very similar.
Sand Dollar with her canvas up. The standing lug sail is very similar to that used for Wee Lass; the rudder design is also very similar.
Kit-built Northeaster Dory by Chesapeake Light Craft, for rowing and rigged with a Balanced Lug sailing rig.
Kit-built Northeaster Dory by Chesapeake Light Craft, for rowing and rigged with a Balanced Lug sailing rig.
A high-performance rowing shell in the foreground, and a two-man rowboat behind. A father-son team rowed this boat in the Texas 200.
A high-performance rowing shell in the foreground, and a two-man rowboat behind. A father-son team rowed this boat in the Texas 200.
"Peggy Ann", an Atkin-designed Rescue Minor.
“Peggy Ann”, an Atkin-designed Rescue Minor.
The transom of Peggy Ann shows off the tunnel stern, which makes ideal for skinny water.
The transom of Peggy Ann shows off the tunnel stern, which makes it ideal for skinny water.
Outboard power boat; at any distance this looked like a fiberglass boat, but it was constructed of plywood using the stitch-and-glue technique.
Outboard power boat; at any distance this looked like a fiberglass boat, but it was constructed of plywood using the stitch-and-glue technique.
The builder of this boat will never get lost; the chart of the local area is glassed into the sides of the hull.
The builder of this boat will never get lost; the chart of the local area is glassed into the sides of the hull.
Another outboard power boat, designed by Jacques Mertens.
Another outboard power boat, designed by Jacques Mertens.
A Glen-L runabout; this little speedster is a "get wet and have fun" boat. That motor is only 20 hp.
A Glen-L runabout; this little speedster is a “get wet and have fun” boat. That motor is only 20 hp.
Wee Lass and Wee Lad. Wee Lad got more compliments than Wee Lass.
Wee Lass and Wee Lad. Wee Lad got more compliments than Wee Lass.
The San Antonio Squadron of the USPS had a booth, and was performing Vessel Safety Checks and guiding kids making their own models.
The San Antonio Squadron of the USPS had a booth, and was performing Vessel Safety Checks and guiding kids making their own models.
There was a "pirate ship" sailing out of the harbor, giving rides to tourists. Judging from the rigging (or the lack of rigging), I doubt that ship has ever been powered by canvas.
There was a “pirate ship” sailing out of the harbor, giving rides to tourists. Judging from the rigging (or the lack of rigging), I doubt that ship has ever been powered by canvas.
Another Northeaster Dory by CLC; this one for rowing only.
Another Northeaster Dory by CLC; this one for rowing only.
A "flat iron skiff"; this one looks to have plywood sides but a traditional cross-planked bottom.
A “flat iron skiff”; this one looks to have plywood sides but a traditional cross-planked bottom.
The festival also had a Family Boatbuilding area; the tent had several teams building skiffs similar to this one.
The festival also had a Family Boatbuilding area; the tent had several teams building skiffs similar to this one.
This boat was described as a peapod, and had been restored by Farley Boat Works.
This boat was described as a peapod, and had been restored by Farley Boat Works.  Suitable for either row or sail.
Stern of the Caledonia Yawl.
Stern of the Caledonia Yawl.
Sunday afternoon the wind subsided enough that most of us decided to hang canvas. The Westport Sharpie is cat-ketch rigged with two spritsails.
Sunday afternoon the wind subsided enough that most of us decided to hang canvas. The Westport Sharpie is cat-ketch rigged with two spritsails.
The Puddle Duck Racer is a simple design that lends itself well to modification or experimentation. This Puddle Duck was morphed into a '57 Chevy.
The Puddle Duck Racer is a simple design that lends itself well to modification or experimentation. This Puddle Duck was morphed into a ’57 Chevy.

As you might have guessed from my last post, I’m a fan of knotwork.  The Caledonia Yawl had some nice marlinspike work on it, and I’m not at all bashful about using someone else’s good ideas on my future projects.

At the mizzen mast, the Caledonia makes good use of belaying pins.
At the mizzen mast, the Caledonia makes good use of belaying pins.
The mizzen sheet is guided by a bulls-eye; the strop for the bulls-eye is secured to the mast with a simple thumb cleat.
The mizzen sheet is guided by a bulls-eye; the strop for the bulls-eye is secured to the mast with a simple thumb cleat.
No need for a shackle or fancy fitting; the mizzen sheet is secured to the end of the bumkin with a simple toggle.
No need for a shackle or fancy fitting; the mizzen sheet is secured to the end of the bumkin with a simple toggle.
More marlinspike work on the Caledonia.
More marlinspike work on the Caledonia.

Monday morning before leaving town I stopped by Farley Boat Works to see the Scow Schooner that was under construction.  Scow schooners were used in the late 1800s, and ideal for the shallow water bays in Texas.  I had seen the Scow Schooner in 2004 when it was being built in Anahuac, but it had since been moved to Farley Boat Works in Port Aransas to complete the project.

Monday morning before we headed home I stopped by Farley Boat Works, where the scow schooner project was underway.
Monday morning before we headed home I stopped by Farley Boat Works, where the scow schooner project was underway.
Bow shot of the scow schooner.
Bow shot of the scow schooner.
Stern of the scow schooner.
Stern of the scow schooner.

One thought on “plyWooden Boat Festival at Port A”

  1. Wife here…it was a very wonderful weekend. Port A knows how the entertain. We have always been on a cruise the weekend of the boat show. I think I had more fun in Port A that on a cruise. Great food…..the boats were good to look at too. Great weekend hubby.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: